Stanford Health Library

Multilingual Health Information Tutorial

This tutorial is provided to help English-speaking people learn how to find information in the Stanford Health Library Multilingual Health Information section, both the foreign language and English versions. The intended primary audience is the Stanford Health Library research associates and staff.

Table of Contents

Return to Multilingual Health Information


Finding Multilingual Health Information

The Multilingual section is divided into sections by language – one for each language for which health information is available. There is a table of links to each language at the top of each page. To find information for a particular language, go to the top of the page and click its name in the table.

The information for each language is subdivided into these sections (according to what information is available):

Where there are a great many links for a given language, the Diseases and Disorders topics are further subdivided into sections like Cancer, Diabetes, Mental Health, Infections. The links in each subsection are in alphabetical sequence.

Some language sections are very short (for example, Amharic, Danish, Maltese) and some are very long (for example, Chinese, Vietnamese), but they're all arranged as described above.

Practice finding the following information (just find each link, don't open it yet):


Managing the Display of Information

When you use the Multilingual section, you'll often want to look at two pages at once:

You can't see two complete pages at a time on a PC with a 14" monitor, but you can see parts of several pages if you re-size the windows. (If you don't know how to re-size windows, read the explanation in the last section of this tutorial.)

When the windows are re-sized, you can see all of one page and part of one or more pages underneath it. You can easily flip back and forth between the pages. Click on any part of a a visible page to bring it to the front.

If you're not used to re-sizing windows, open some pages in the Multilingual section and practice viewing two or more of them of them at once until you're comfortable doing that.

Each link in the Multilingual section is opened in a new window. Many websites do not do that. Instead, they open links in the current window; that is, they replace the current page with the linked-to page. If you want to see both pages at the same time, right-click the link and click Open link in new window.


Translating Information

There is an English version of most of the multilingual information, so you don't need to translate health articles, but you may need to translate words or terms to find the information you need.

There is a link to a translator for thirteen of the languages in the Multilingual section. The translator is a tool that translates words, terms, or blocks of text. We use the same translator (WorldLingo) for each of those thirteen languages.

For ten other languages, where no translator is available, there is a link to a dictionary. A dictionary is less useful; it translates single words.

There is no online translator or dictionary for the other languages.


Translating from English to Foreign

Go to the Russian section now and open the translator. Observe:

When you are helping a client who speaks little or no English, you may be able to determine her topic of interest by translating what you think it is into her language until you find the right one. Suppose a Russian client indicated that she had a problem with her eyes. Try translating these terms from English to Russian (You can translate all five of them at once.):

Some of the multilingual information has English titles for foreign information. You could translate these for the benefit of our foreign readers, or show them how to do it. See, for example, the titles of the information sheets in:

You have at least two pages open now: Skin Diseases and the translator. If you can't see both of them, re-size the windows before continuing.

Translate a few of the Skin Disease titles to Greek. It's tedious to type long terms; it's much easier to use the browser's Copy/Paste functions. (If you don't know how to do this, read the explanation in the last section of this tutorial.) Copy the title, and paste it into the translator's input box.

If you haven't used the browser's Copy/Paste functions before, practice translating titles of skin diseases from English to Greek until you're comfortable doing that. Then close the Greek Skin Diseases page.


Translating from Foreign to English

When you are helping a client who speaks little or no English, she may show you her topic of interest in her language. You may be able to translate it to English to understand what she wants.

If her language uses the roman alphabet, it's easy. Translate essoufflement from French to English. The translator may interpret simple misspellings correctly. For example, esoufflement (just one s) or essouflement (just one f) translate correctly. If you misspell the word badly enough or select the wrong language, the translation fails. Try translating souflement to observe the result of a failed translation.

If her language uses the roman alphabet with accented characters or diacritical marks, it's still easy. The translator usually interprets such characters correctly, with or without the accent or diacritical mark. Try entering the word(s) you want to translate without accents or diacritical marks. If the translation fails or doesn't seem correct, try it again:

Click Show Advanced Options and observe the 6 drop-down lists for character input. Now try these translations:

If her language doesn't use the roman alphabet, you can't type it in the translator with an English keyboard. However, you can use the browser's Copy/Paste functions to copy foreign words from online information to the translator. Open this link:

Translate the list of 25 chapters (the list on the top lefthand side of the page). Copy the whole list and paste it into the translator's input box.

Observe that the English translation is fairly awkward (so would the result of translating English to Chinese, presumably), but you can understand it fairly well.


Printing Translated Text

It may be convenient for you or your client to have a printed copy of some translated text. If the window where you just translated the Chinese Merck Manual list of chapters is still open, bring it to the front. If not, translate that information again. Now print the translator window to get a printed copy of whatever text is visible in the original and translation boxes.

If, as in this case, not all of the text is visible, you can scroll down the two boxes and print the next part of the text. Alternatively, you can copy and paste the contents of either or both boxes to a word processing program like Microsoft Word and print that. An easy way to highlight all the text in the box is:

  1. Click in the box
  2. Type Ctrl-A or click Select All in the browser's Edit menu


Unique Translators

There are links to two translation tools that are different from the others in the Multilingual section.


Finding Information in Collections

Much of the multilingual information is in various collections. The largest collection of general health information is:

There are three other large collections of general health information available in various languages. Remember to use the browser's Find function when you're looking for a particular topic in these collections:

There are many other collections of Multilingual information organized in different ways. Some are collections of general health information. Others are collections of information on a specific health topic, like Skin Diseases or Women's Health. These other collections are discussed in other sections of this tutorial.


Finding Information in Websites

Many of the links in the Multilingual section are to websites. Websites are organized in many different ways. Finding specific information in one takes practice.

You need to observe what a website "tells you about itself", and click on links to go through the website section by section or page by page until you find what you're looking for (or discover that what you're looking for isn't there). You've probably done this with the Stanford Health Library website.

Most websites provide a way to search for information. Look for a search box or just the word search, usually near the top of the page. Each search function has rules – they're not all the same. For example:

If you don't get the result you expected from a search, try different input and examine the result. Also, look for additional information about the website's search function, like Advanced search or Search help near the search box.

Many health information websites have online publications – pamphlets or booklets or brochures. Look for those words on the website's home page.

Each of the multilingual websites is discussed in this tutorial. In each discussion, there are observations about the website's organization and suggestions for investigating its contents.


Finding English Versions

You need the English version of multilingual information so that you know what information you're giving to your client. Sources of multilingual information provide the English version in many different ways. You'll investigate the various ways in this section of the tutorial.

Bilingual Articles

Sometimes there is a single article that contains both English and foreign text. Investigate each of these examples:

This collection of general health information is partly bilingual:


Separate Foreign and English Articles

When an article is not bilingual, there are links to the separate foreign and English versions of the article. Here are some examples. Look at the foreign version and English version of each. You can usually tell from the format and occasional illustrations that each pair contains the same information, even if you can't read the foreign version.

Sometimes the foreign version is clearly a subset of the English version:


Links to Foreign and English Versions

Collections of articles have links to the articles in the collection. Sometimes the links to both the foreign and English versions are in a single document. Investigate these examples to see various ways in which links are presented:


Separate Foreign and English Links

Some collections have links to foreign articles in one document and links to English articles in another. It's not quite as easy to find matching articles as when the links are together. Sometimes the set of foreign articles is a subset of the English articles, and the two sets of links are quite different. As you investigate the following collections, be sure to find the English version of a few articles:

This collection is very easy to use, because the foreign links have English titles, and the foreign and English lists of links are exactly the same:

These collections have English titles for the foreign links, but the foreign articles are a subset of the English articles. You have to search the English collection to find the article that matches the foreign one:

This collection doesn't have English titles for the foreign information, but it's still easy to use because the foreign and English topics are in the same sequence (You can verify this by translating a few topic titles):

Other collections are difficult for an English reader to use, because the foreign links don't have English titles, and the foreign and English topic lists aren't in the same sequence. Collections like this are discussed in section "Information for Foreign Readers".


Multilingual Websites

The following websites have English and foreign versions. The tutorial has observations about each website's organization and suggestions for investigating its contents. The link to each of these websites in the Multilingual section is accompanied by a link to the corresponding section of the tutorial.

Alzheimer Society of Canada, available in French

The Canadian Alzheimer Society has translated its entire website to French, but you can't switch between the two languages page by page. There is a version of the entire website in both languages, but you can only switch between their home pages.

Go to the French section, and open the website. Notice the Français link at the left-hand top of the page. Right-click it and click Open page in new window to open the French home page. Compare the two home pages. You can see that they have the same information, even if you don't read French. Observe the list of sections on the left-hand side of both home pages.

Investigate the website by looking for information on Vascular Dementia, first in English:

  • Go to section Alzheimer Disease
  • Then to topic Related Dementias
  • Then to subtopic Vascular Dementia

You can also find that information by searching for "vascular dementia". Be sure to enclose the term in quotation marks (observe the difference in the search results if you don't).

Now switch to the French home page, and follow the same path to find the French information on Vascular Dementia. Use the translator to translate section and topic titles, if necessary.

You can also translate vascular dementia to French and search for that term in the French version of the website. But you might find it difficult to understand the search results, which are entirely in French.

Briefly Investigate the other sections of the English website to see what other information is available.

Arthritis Canada, available in French

The Canadian Arthritis Society has translated its entire website to French. You can switch back and forth between English and French on any page in the website.

Go to the French section, and open the website. Notice the Français button at the left-hand top of the page. Click it to open the French version of the page. Notice the English button at the left-hand top of the French page. Click it to open the English version of the page.

On the home page, observe the major sections of the website, listed below the heading. Investigate the two sections that are apt to be of most interest to Health Library clients – Types of Arthritis and Tips for Living Well.

Asian American Diabetes Initiative: Joslin Diabetes Center, available in Traditional Chinese and Simplified Chinese

This website is trilingual. You can switch back and forth between English, Traditional Chinese, and Simplified Chinese on any page in the website.

Go to the Chinese section, and open the website. Notice the three buttons in the page heading: English, Traditional Chinese, Simplified Chinese. Click one to open that version of the page.

Bleeding Disorders: World Federation of Hemophilia, available in French

The World Federation of Hemophilia has translated its entire website to French. You can switch back and forth between English and French on any page in the website.

Go to the French section, and open the website. Notice the Français button at the right-hand top of the page. Click it to open the French version of the page. Notice the English button at the right-hand top of the French page. Click it to open the English version of the page.

On the home page, observe the major sections of the website, listed on the left side. Investigate the section that is apt to be of most interest to Health Library clients – About Bleeding Disorders

Canadian Cancer Society, available in French

The Canadian Cancer Society has translated its entire website to French. You can switch back and forth between English and French on any page in the website.

Go to the French section, and open the website. Notice the Français button in the yellow title bar. Click it to open the French version of the page. Notice the English button in the yellow title bar of the French page. Click it to open the English version of the page.

Investigate the English version of the website. While you do that, click the Français button on at least one page to open the French version of that page.

On the home page, observe the major sections of the website, listed below the heading. Click About cancer to go to that section.

Find information about a side effect of chemotherapy:

  • From any page, go to section About Cancer.
  • Click Treatment in the list of topics in the left-hand column.
  • Click Chemotherapy in the list of Treatment subtopics in the list of topics.
  • Click Side Effects in the Related Information list on the right-hand side of the page.
  • Click a specific side effect in the Related Information list on the right-hand side of the page.

Find information about ovarian cancer symptoms:

  • From any page, go to section About Cancer.
  • Click the Select specific cancer box and click Ovarian cancer in the drop-down list of cancers.
  • Click Signs and symptoms in the Related Information list on the right-hand side of the page.

Investigate the online pamphlets:

  • From any page, go to section Publications.
  • Click topic Publications on cancer treatments in the list of topics on the left-hand side of the page, and observe that there are five pamphlets on this topic.
  • Click Alphabetical list of publications and find a pamphlet about Chemotherapy and another about Radiation Therap

Hmong Health Website, available in Hmong

You don't switch between languages in this bilingual website. The website has bilingual text on each page. Go to the Hmong section and open the website.

Observe the list of sections (Information Resources), English titles on the left-hand side of the page and Hmong titles on the right-hand side. Also observe the search function at the top of the page (it appears on all pages).

Investigate the website by finding information about heart failure in both of these ways:

  • Use the website's search function to find the page that has information on heart failure.

  • Go from section to section of the website, starting on the home page, until you reach the page that has the information on heart failure. If you don't know where to start, examine each of the major sections listed on the home page. After that, it's pretty obvious.

International Cystitis Association, available in Chinese, German, French, Italian, Japanese

The International Cystitis Association has provided translations of four brochures. The titles and English versions are:

Liver Disease:Canadian Liver Foundation, available in French

The Canadian Liver Foundation has translated its entire website to French. You can switch back and forth between English and French on any page in the website.

Go to the French section, and open the website. Notice the Français link at the right-hand top of the page. Click it to open the French version of the page. Notice the English link at the right-hand top of the French page. Click it to open the English version of the page.

Investigate the English version of the website. While you do that, click the Français button on at least one page to open the French version of that page.

Observe the ten major sections of the website, listed on the left-hand side of the page. Click Liver Disease in the section list. Observe that the list expands to include topics in that section.

Find information about gallstones:

  • On any page, click section Liver Disease.
  • Go to topic Adult Liver Diseases
  • Go to subtopic Gallstones

Look for a pamphlet about gallstones:

  • From any page, go to section Publications
  • You're looking for online publications, so read the information about publications, and go to Publications Library.
  • Open the English version of the brochure on Gallstones
  • Switch to the French version of the Publications Library.
  • Open the French version of the brochure on Gallstones (Calculs biliaires).

Briefly investigate the other sections of the website to see what other information is available.

Men's Health Programme: Hong Kong Department of Health, available in Traditional Chinese and Simplified Chinese

This website is trilingual. You can switch back and forth between English, Traditional Chinese, and Simplified Chinese on any page in the website.

Go to the Chinese section, and open the website. Notice the gray tabs below the heading -- Text Only and two with Chinese text. The first one is Traditional Chinese, the second is Simplified Chinese. Click one to open that version of the page. Notice the English link in the right-most tab of the Chinese page. Click it to open the English version of the page.

Observe the major sections of the website, listed on the left-hand side of the page. Investigate each section to see what information is available. While you do that, switch to a Chinese version and back to the English version of at least one page.

Which section has information on each of these topics?

  • Prostate Cancer
  • Depression
  • Quitting smoking

Promoting Good Health Through Diet & Lifestyle: UC Berkeley, available in Vietnamese

This website is not completely bilingual, but it has bilingual Vietnamese and English text on most pages. Go to the Vietnamese section and open the website.

Observe the five Lesson tabs at the top of the page. Click any one to go to that lesson.

Observe the row of page numbers below the Lesson tabs (for example, 8 pages in lesson 1). Click each page number to go through a lesson page by page. Observe that each page contains the illustrated Vietnamese version, followed by the English translation of the text.

Now observe the download information below the row of page numbers and the page title. You can:

  • Get the page (Vietnamese only) as a PDF, which is nice for printing.
  • Get the entire lesson (Vietnamese only) as a PDF.
  • Get the entire lesson as a Zip file, a data format that is not useful here.

Romanian Alzheimer Society, available in Romanian

The Romanian Alzheimer Society has translated its entire website to English, but you can't switch between the two languages page by page. There is a version of the entire website in both languages, but you can only switch between their home pages.

Go to the Romanian section, and open the website. Notice the english version link near the left-hand top of the page. Right-click it and click Open page in new window to open the English home page. Compare the two home pages. You can see that they have the same information, even if you don't read Romanian. Observe the list of sections on the left-hand side of both home pages.

Investigate the website by looking at the information on the following topics, both in English and Romanian:

  • What are dementias?
  • Alzheimer Dementia
  • Information for families
  • Information for patients
  • Advice for persons caring for people suffering from Alzheimer

Waldenstroms's Macroglobulinemia Foundation, available in French

The International Waldenstrom's Macroglobulinemia Foundation has two versions of its website, English and French. You can select the other version from each one's home page.

The two versions are identical except that the French version does not contain sections Research, Resources or End Notes.


Other Presentations of English and Foreign Versions

There are several collections of multilingual information that present the English (or foreign) version differently than the ways discussed in the prior sections. Investigate each of these collections:

Chinese Health Information: NYU Medical Center, available in Chinese:

This website has many articles with bilingual Chinese/English text and many others only in Chinese. Go to the Chinese section, and open the website. Observe the navigation bar at the top of the page.

Go to section "NYUDH Patient Education Documents". This is the collection of bilingual Chinese/English articles. Investigate at least one of them.

Now go to section "More Health Links", the collection of Chinese-only articles, and investigate at least one of them.

Myeloma Information & Treatment:International Myeloma Foundation, available in Chinese, French, German, Italian, Japanese, Korean, Polish, Portuguese, Russian, Turkish

The International Myeloma Foundation has translated many of its publications to the foreign languages listed above. Go to the section for any of these languages, and open the foreign link to the IMF website.

Observe the title or picture of each of the IMF publications available in that language. Click any of the publications. Observe this information on the page:

  • The text of the publication (this is usually not present).
  • The PDF icon on the right-hand side of the page. Click it to view the foreign version of the publication as a PDF.
  • "We Speak Your Language" and the list of language links below the PDF icon. Click English to view the English version of the publication or a link to it


Finding Spanish Information

The Spanish section is different from the other language sections. It has just one primary source of information – the bilingual MedlinePlus website.

There is an enormous amount of Spanish health information on the Internet. All the National Institutes of Health and many other health organizations publish some of their information in both English and Spanish. Some examples are the American Cancer Society, the Muscular Dystrophy Association, "Family Doctor" from the American Association of Family Physicians, and "Kids' Health" from the Nemours Foundation.

MedlinePlus provides access to all this information. Their Spanish site is organized exactly like their English site. It has (my guess) about 30% of the information, which is a lot of information. You can find the Spanish information without knowing any Spanish at all.

Go to the Spanish section, and observe the bilingual links to five MedlinePlus sections. Temas de Salud is the Spanish version of English section Health Topics, and so on. Investigate the website by looking for information on Colorectal Cancer.

You can switch between English and Spanish on any page in the website. Open MedlinePlus Health Topics. Observe the español button in the right-hand top of the page. Click it to open the Spanish version of that page – a page in section Temas de Salud. Observe the English button at the right-hand top of the Temas de Salud page. Click it to open the English version of the page. If you want to see both versions of a page at the same time, right-click the español or English button, and click Open link in new window.

You can also open the Spanish version of an article from the English version of the website, and vice versa. In English Health Topics, find and open the "Colorectal Cancer" page. Observe that some of the links say, "Also available in: Spanish". Click the word Spanish to open the Spanish version.

You also need to know how to help a Spanish-reading client find this information. First use the translator to find out what Colorectal Cancer is in Spanish. Then open MedlinePlus Temas de Salud. Find and open the "Cáncer colorectal" page. Notice that most of the links say, "Tambien está disponible en: inglés". You can probably figure out what that means; if not, look it up in the translator.

Now investigate the MedlinePlus encyclopedia. Find information about Klinefelter's Syndrome in the Medical Encyclopedia or information about Síndrome de Klinefelter in the Enciclopedia médica. Whichever one you do, click the español or English button to see the other version.

MedlinePlus also has extensive information on prescription and over-the-counter medications in Spanish – all the MedMaster information on medications is available in Spanish. Investigate this section by finding Spanish information about Lipitor, either:

There are two more sections in Spanish MedlinePlus: Interactive Tutorials and News. You probably won't use these, but show them to our Spanish-reading clients.

Many of the sources of multilingual information in other languages provide information in Spanish as well. Most of them are not included in the Spanish section, because MedlinePlus provides so much information.

There are a few links in the Spanish section to sources that MedlinePlus doesn't access. You investigated the Pediatric Health Information earlier. You'll investigate the Merck Manual in the next section.


Information for Foreign Readers

As you've observed, most of the information in the Multilingual section is accessible to both English and foreign readers. However, some information is exclusively or primarily for foreign readers. Even if you don't read a foreign language, you need to be aware of this information and how some of it it is useful for you, as well as for foreign readers.

Foreign Sites with No English

There are quite a few websites in the Multilingual section that contain no English information at all. You need to be aware of these so that you can show them to foreign-reading clients.

For example, go to the German section, and observe that there are seven [no English] websites – five general collections, one cancer, and one Alzheimer's.


Foreign Sites Derived from English Information

There are a few websites in the Multilingual section that are derived from English sites, but that contain no English. With a little help from the translator, you can determine what's in a foreign version by comparing it to the English version from which it is derived

PDQ Treatment Summaries for Patients:University of Bonn Medical Center, available in German
Go to the German / Cancer section, and open both the German and English versions of PDQ Treatment Summaries for Patients.

The German version is a list of the German translation of about 40 National Cancer Institute Treatment PDQ®s.

The English version is a list of the National Cancer Institute PDQ®s that are the source of the German translations. (The list is only Adult Cancers; there's a link to Pediatric Cancers at the top of the page.)

The German translations are apparently being kept up to date. Note the date last modified (Diese Seite wurde zuletzt geändert ...) at the bottom of each PDQ. However, they may not be as current as the NCI PDQs.


Merck Manual of Medical Information, Home Edition, available in Chinese, Dutch, Japanese, Portuguese, and Spanish
Merck & Co. has online versions of their Home Edition in several languages other than English. They're not direct translations of the English version. However, it's fairly easy for an English reader to find information in a foreign version; at least to determine if a particular topic is included. To do this, you need to understand how the manuals are organized, and do a little translation.

All of the manuals are organized into topics within subjects within sections. They all have the same sections, but the foreign ones may have fewer ubjects in a section, fewer topics in a subject, and less information on a topic.

Go to the foreign language of your choice, and open the foreign and English versions of the Merck Manual. Investigate the manuals by finding information about "Prostate Cancer".

First, use the search function in the English manual to look for information on prostate cancer. Look for the result that seems to be the primary source of information -- Cancer:Prostate Disorders. Click it. Observe the information at the top of the page: "Cancer" is a topic in subject "Prostate Disorders", which is in section "Men's Health Issues".

Now use your understanding of the manual's organization to find information on prostate cancer in the foreign language of your choice:

  1. Observe the list of sections on the left-hand side of the page in each manual.
  2. Translate the foreign list of sections to English, and click the one that means "Men's Health Issues".
  3. Translate the subject titles to English, and click the one that has information about "Prostate Disorders".
  4. Is there information on cancer in that subject? (Yes, there is, in all five foreign versions.)

You could translate "Prostate Cancer" to the foreign language you've chosen, and search for that in the foreign manual – copy it from the translator result, and paste it into the search box. But you may find it difficult to understand the search results.


Foreign Sites with English Descriptions or Titles

Several websites are in a foreign language, so you can't read them. But they contain English descriptions or titles, so you can tell what's in them.These websites are valuable sources of information for you, as well as for foreign readers.

Medical Information in Russian (MedInfoRus)
Patient Information:MedInfoRus
, available in Russian:
The first link is to a website that is an excellent source of Russian health information with English descriptions. Go to the Russian section and open the website. Investigate briefly the seven sections of the website to see what sort of information is available.

The second link is to the Patient Information section of the website. Go to that section. Observe the list of topics for which information is available.

Click topic "Cancer", and observe the information that's available for that topic. When you help a Russian client use this information, translate the list of cancer topics to Russian for her use (or show her how to do it).

Investigate your choice of some other Patient Information topics.

The website doesn't have English versions of the articles, but the source of some of the Patient Information articles is the NSW Health Department. Those articles also appear in :

  • Common Health Topics:NSW Dept. of Health, AU

If you want the English version, you can find it there.


Vietnamese Community Health Promotion Project:UCSF, available in Vietnamese:
Go to the Vietnamese section, and open the website. Observe that it contains a variety of information.

The most useful health information is a collection of Cancer Booklets. Click the second row in the blue column of the table to see them. The various booklets have this English information:

  • "Cervical Cancer Screening" has separate Vietnamese and English versions.
  • "Cervical Cancer" has a Note to Providers on page 19, which summarizes the booklet in English.
  • "Hepatitis B" has a bilingual table of contents and a Note to Providers on the last page.
  • "A Beautiful Future" has a bilingual table of contents and a Note to Providers near the end.
  • "Breast Cancer" has a Note to Providers on page 17.
  • "Vietnamese Cookbook" has no English information. (The title page says that it's bilingual, but the English section is not present.)
  • "How to Quit Smoking" has no English information.
American Cancer Society – Northern California Chinese Unit, available in Chinese
Go to the Chinese section, and open both the Chinese and English versions of this website. Observe the six circles in the Chinese version; they're links to the major sections of the website. The 4th section is the one with the most information about cancer – it's the "English version of the website" you just opened. (You could open the same page by clicking the 4th circle in the Chinese version.)

In the English version, observe the list of sub-sections on the left-hand side of the page with bilingual Chinese/English titles.

Click "cancer info". Observe the list of topics with bilingual Chinese/English titles. All of the articles except "Cancer Survivors Network" are available in both Chinese and English, but not in this website. You'll find links to them elsewhere in the Chinese/Cancer section of the Stanford Health Library website.


Collections with Topic Lists That Don't Match

Some collections that have links to both foreign and English topics are difficult for an English reader to use, because:

You need to be aware of these collections so that you can show them to foreign-reading clients. If you examine them yourself, you need to translate the name of a topic from foreign to English to find the English version (if there is one).

The collections organized like this are listed below. Investigate these collections briefly – try to find the English version of an article in each one.


Links to Foreign Cancer Information

Cancer Resources:Guide to Internet Resources for Cancer, available in several languages
This is a document that provides links to internet cancer resources in several languages other than English. You need to be aware of it so that you can show it to foreign-reading clients who are looking for information about cancer.

Go to the Italian section, for example, and open the Cancer Resources Guide to observe the information available there.


Using Browser Functions

Here are instructions for some useful PC Internet Explorer browser functions. Other browsers provide the same functions, but the user interface may differ slightly.

Copy/Paste

  1. Highlight the text you want to copy: left-click, hold, and drag across the text.
  2. Type Ctrl-C (press the Ctrl and C keys at the same time) or click Copy in the browser's Edit menu.
  3. Click where you want to paste the text .
  4. Type Ctrl-V (press the Ctrl and V keys at the same time) or click Paste in the browser's Edit menu.

Find

  1. Type Ctrl-F (press the Ctrl and F keys at the same time) or click Find (on This Page) in the browser's Edit menu.
  2. Type what you're looking for in the input box. It doesn't have to be a complete word. If you're looking for Alzheimer's Disease, you can type just alz.
  3. Press Enter.
  4. The first occurrence of your search term on the page will be highlighted. (The browser starts a search from its current position on the page, so be sure you're at the top of the page before you start a search.)
  5. To find the next occurrence, click Find Next.
  6. Repeat until you find what you're looking for or reach the end of the page.

Resize Windows

When a window is maximized, as they often are, the window fills the entire screen, and you can see only one page at a time.

Notice the three buttons at the upper right-hand corner of a maximized window. Click the middle one (two overlapping squares) to make the window smaller. Then you can make it even smaller: left-click on the lower right-hand corner (the corner with the diagonal stripes), hold, and drag until the window is the size you want. Now you can see all of one page and part of one or more pages underneath it.

Click on any part of a a visible page to bring it to the front. You can also move the pages around: left-click on the page title bar, hold, and drag the window to the location you want.

Open Link in New Window

To open a link in a new window, right-click the link and click Open link in new window.

Stanford Medicine Resources:

IMPORTANT NOTE: Linking to commercial and other sites, or sites where these might lead, does not imply endorsement of products, services, or content. Please keep in mind that The Stanford Health Library dispenses information, not medical advice. Although we're happy to help you find the materials you need, your health care professional is the only person qualified to give you a medical opinion.

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